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What do you like most about the protected bike lanes? 

114 Responses

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Catherine Shore 4 months ago

I like the physical barrier between traffic and the curb to protect me when I ride.

22 Votes
 
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Lee Smith 4 months ago

I like how comfortable it is riding in the bike lanes compared to with traffic. Cyclists are a lot closer in form and function to pedestrians than to vehicles, and having the cycling space adjacent to the pedestrian space, protected from vehicles, reflects that.

17 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

I disagree with cyclists being closer to pedestrians. When I go between 20-50km/hr down any given roadway in the city my speed is much closer in ratio to a car than a pedestrian.

1 Vote
 
 
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Jeff Schoffer 4 months ago

I like absolutely nothing about these lanes. They take up parking. They prevent right turns on Red Lights. Going from two lanes to one causes traffic jams. The lanes aren't marked and you can't see which lane you should be in during winter. Please remove these useless lanes and let traffic flow like it should.

22 Votes
 
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Tom Poole 4 months ago

I don't like anything about the downtown protected bike lanes, because: fewer parking spots; can only turn right when pedestrians are in crosswalk; dangerous for passengers exiting vehicle; businesses clear snow into bike lanes (no other option); poor traffic flow with single lanes; 4th Ave - zig-zag lanes, and can't see lanes in winter; I do not believe there are 300 bikes per day - I rarely (if ever!) see bikes in downtown bike lanes. Make 2nd Ave for bikes and pedestrians only, no vehicles - already very restricted street. Bike lanes need to be planned for NEW streets, restricted on busy downtown streets. Bring back scramble corners.

15 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

I like your idea about 2nd Ave bring a pedestrian street. I disagree with rest, I think what you are describing is unwillingness to change an outdated system.

2 Votes
 
 
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Jeanna South 4 months ago

I like that I can safely bike to downtown activities with my eight-year-old, like the library. The bike lanes give people another choice for safe transportation.

16 Votes
 
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Cora Janzen 4 months ago

I like the safety/protection that these provide and also it is clear of where I am supposed to be in the lane (people cycling have an assigned space). I love seeing more females, youth and parents with children cycling in these lanes (this is a sign of safety and comfort of the infrastructure) and coming to/through downtown on bike.

16 Votes
 
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CD Poilievre 4 months ago

I agree they provide safety for bikers but they are annoying for drivers and should be removed. Driving downtown is already a bit of a nightmare with the trains and the shortage of parking without complicating things more with these bike lanes. Seems like a real poor use of civic dollars.

14 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

so you agree they are safer but them removed because they are annoying...

2 Votes
 
 
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Rhonda Kincade 4 months ago

Sorry but these lanes are way too underutilized to be worthwhile. Would be great if we didn't have 8 months of winter per year.

19 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

Hop on a bike and go for a ride you might like it.

3 Votes
 
 
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Erin Spinney 4 months ago

I really like the bike lane on 4th because of how it connects to the Broadway bridge when coming downtown. I no longer feel like I'm going to have to dart out into traffic to dodge car doors opening. I also like that I am protected from traffic, though I think that a more permanent barrier (flower pots would be lovely) than the white poles would help, because they get knocked off or bent over into the bike lane often.

15 Votes
 
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Joseph McDonald 4 months ago

Primarily I like that these lanes provide much needed familiarity for drivers and cyclists alike in the city with regards to how to use and drive around protected bike lanes. I think that this is a great pilot project that highlights that the city definitely could benefit from protected bike lanes, but there is much room for improvement.

The things I particularly like about the lanes is how comfortable I feel when riding in them. I normally ride in traffic (daily commuter all year round) and on the occasions when I have a reason to use the lanes I find them to feel a lot safer and I have far less concern with regards to getting doored, getting flipped off, honked at , or yelled at. It makes for a far more relaxing ride and highlights why I think protected lanes are important.

15 Votes
 
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Scott Theede 4 months ago

I really like lane coming off the Broadway Bridge heading North. I enjoy the protection from getting doored accidentally by drivers.

16 Votes
 
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Blaine Gysler 4 months ago

Are use the lane on fourth Avenue regularly, and I even go out of my way to use it because I feel so much more comfortable and relaxed away from cars. I am surprised that so many car drivers are upset about them. You would think they would like us to be out of their way.

14 Votes
 
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George Singler 4 months ago

i think it is a real waste of tax $ mostly in winter months but at anytime of the year it is not used as much as it would be by cars

11 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

you have the power to help change that.

2 Votes
 
 
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Crystal Dawn 4 months ago

I don't like anything about the bike lanes. I am an avid cycler and I go out of my way to avoid the streets with bike lanes. They are a waste of money and cause more trouble than they are worth in our congested downtown.

16 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

so you feel safer biking on the road rather than in the bikes lanes?

0 Votes
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Crystal Dawn 4 months ago

I don't feel unsafe on the roads that don't have bike lanes. I know the biking traffic signals and feel that drivers give me appropriate space. The way cyclists are expected to turn using these bike lanes is silly and I avoid them, in part because of this.

1 Vote
 
 
 
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Bert B 4 months ago

The protected bike lanes are a great step toward a multimodal transportation system in the city. For me these are the safest and most comfortable way to travel on a bike. Saskatoon has a higher per capita percentage of cyclists than many Canadian cities. Similar projects have proven successful in so many other Canadian and international winter cities. I'm happy that Saskatoon is joining the party.

13 Votes
 
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Bruce Howlett 4 months ago

There is no doubt that Saskatoon needs bike lanes, however downtown Saskatoon was not designed with them in mind and there is simply no room for them unless city council is willing to spend some major cash and make some tough decisions to make the room. Any new development like River Landing should require room for cyclists on the roads. There will never be complete harmony between cyclists and motor vehicles. Let's face it, vehicles do things that annoy cyclists and cyclists do things that annoy drivers. Then there are the pedestrians who don't know what the flashing hand means. The no right turn on red is putting pedestrians and cyclists at risk because drivers that have already waited through a light where they could easily have proceeded safely on a red light, are not going to wait through a second light. They are going to crowd the crosswalk and block the bike lane to their right to make sure they get through that green light. That's simple observation while moving around downtown. I also do not see the rationale behind no right turn on the red light. A cyclist coming from my left through a green light is visible enough that there should not be problem yielding to them just as you would a vehicle. There should not be a cyclist coming from the right unless they are on the wrong side of the street going against the bike lane flow. The cyclist that's actually in danger is the one moving quickly from behind and to the right as both the cyclist and the driver turning right move to make it through while the light is green. Get rid of the no right turn on red light. It is not serving any useful purpose.

3 Votes
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Lee Smith 4 months ago

Saskatoon has some of the widest downtown streets of any Canadian city. There is plenty of room. Also, the downtown was not designed with cars and trucks in mind, either (it wasn't "designed" at all, it just developed naturally). Many other cities (including winter cities) have gotten this right; are we so arrogant to assume that best practices don't apply to us?

Additionally, the "no right on red" isn't for cyclists approaching from the left, it's for the green bike boxes at the corners, where cyclists are supposed to wait for green lights.

8 Votes
 
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

The no right turn is because there are the green boxes for cyclists to wait in so they don't have to leave the bike lane and go into traffic to make left hand turns. I disagree with your ability to rationalize people disregarding them.

3 Votes
 
 
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Larry Williams 4 months ago

So we are going to inconvenience 300,000+ citizens to satisfy 300. Scrap the program. As I recall when visiting Vienna, the bike lanes were incorporated into the sidewalks/boulevards and not the streets. 4th Avenue is a virtual disaster for motorists - from the drivers side exiting the vehicle into an oncoming traffic lane and from the passenger side exiting the vehicle into the bike lane (of course that may not be a problem as few people use the bike lanes).

13 Votes
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Lee Smith 4 months ago

How you saw it in Vienna is an example of excellent cycling infrastructure. Which means it's also very expensive. It would be great to have that kind of thing in Saskatoon eventually, but we have to start small and cheap with pilot projects like this.

9 Votes
 
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

Inconveniencing 300,000 is extreme hyperbole. If driving is so hard downtown, try using the bike lanes, they are very convenient and fun to ride in. Especially on a nice summer day.

5 Votes
 
 
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Marilyn Plant 4 months ago

These lanes are not used enough to warrant cost of maintaining them. Also a bike is a vehicle and as such should be licensed and follow ALL rules of the road which very few do. Get rid of the lanes completely

7 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

that's not bikers' fault that is SGI not providing that option likely because they are too easy to steal. I would love to license my bike for theft and for accidents but then what about children? Do 3 year old kids need one on their bike and if not then do you write them a ticket? Do you then have to have a drivers license for a bike? There are very few drivers who follow the rules of the road although I agree and there are bikers who do dumb things too. If you could license your bike would drivers then give bikers more respect on the road?

0 Votes
 
 
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Marilyn Plant 4 months ago

I like nothing about them. Get rid of them. Too costly to maintain for a select few, small percentage of population

7 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

help change that! (buy a bike)

3 Votes
 
 
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Dawn Ginter 4 months ago

I work downtown and walk the streets on my breaks. My daily walking route includes 2 streets with bike lanes. I have only seen 1 biker on the 23rd st. Lane so far this year. It was full of ice and snow most of the winter. And the damage to vehicles from ramming into those posts is crazy. They are so hard to see! I've seen more car/pole accidents than ive seen bikers use the lanes. Also, from my many downtown walks I have noticed that a lot of our sidewalks are very wide. Perhaps wide enough to fit 1 lane for pedestrians and 1 lane for bikers. Some landscaping adjustments may have to be done, but I think this would be a much safer and useful space to use than our tiny downtown streets.

8 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

Interesting you have only seen one biker on the path, as I have used it 50 times+ already this year. Do you think cyclists going 30-40 km down a sidewalk would be safe?

2 Votes
 
 
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Theo Julian 4 months ago

Active Transportation is a vital imperative to every growing community. Cycling is a big part of active transportation. Car oriented design no longer works for modern cities. I hope Saskatoon can evolve beyond the car and include cycling routes for all ages and abilities.
Alternatively, we can follow the path of car proliferation and choose against active transportation/cycling..Why not ! It worked for Detroit right ?

12 Votes
 
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Jennifer Kitchen 4 months ago

These bike lanes are a nightmare - very confusing for drivers! I can't imagine being a new driver trying to navigate my way around them. PLEASE get rid of them asap.

6 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

buy a bike and go for a ride Jennifer Kitchen :-) it could help you understand them. many young people millenialscough* are doing that these days so it might be less of a problem than you think :-)

1 Vote
 
 
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Susan Bonnor 4 months ago

I like the idea of protected bike lanes but they are not practical in the locations they have been placed. I don't think the costs associated with the upkeep and changes to traffic patterns is worth it for the few months that most people would be utilizing them. There are very few people utilizing them in the winter months. The marked bike lanes along other streets without the posts seem to work well.

5 Votes
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Mel Brockman, Researcher/Evaluator 4 months ago

I wouldn't say it's only a "few months." Our temperatures actually allow for comfortable cycling conditions for at least 7 months of the year (roughly April to October). Also, few people utilize things like our parks in the winter, but I don't think that makes the case for getting rid of them.

3 Votes
 
 
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Dwight Doering 4 months ago

The "protected" bike lanes are a hazard for all concerned. Pedestrians have to cross active traffic to get to their parked vehicles. Cyclists and motor vehicles are both at risk. I was travelling north on 4th Ave. on May 1. I saw a cyclist traveling at speed in the bike lane and a SUV was turning off of 4th into the parking area under Sturdy Stone. As the SUV crossed the bike lane the cyclist slammed into the rear quarter panel of the SUV denting it and falling to the ground. There was no way that the driver of the SUV could see the cyclist coming because of the cars parked along 4th. The whole thing is a disaster waiting to happen and what I saw is a prime example.

12 Votes
 
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Andrew Wallace 4 months ago

I like that cyclists are being given a dedicated, protected space in which to ride. I like that Saskatoon is finally implementing this common-sense approach, which has already been successfully proven in many other cities, like Vancouver, Ottawa, Montreal, to name ones I have recently seen.

11 Votes
 
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Zack MacGregor 4 months ago

I like the idea of the bike lanes. It's nice to have a lane that is safe to ride in. I ride the full length of the 4th ave bike lane every day to work and back home. I like to see the city trying to modernize and offer alternatives to driving. Car culture here is very strong and it's hard to change opinions about active transportation.

It's nice that the onus of safety isn't being pushed exclusively onto cyclists. So many other cities are pushing for cyclists to be forced to wear helmets and hi-vis, etc, without any other road user group or infrastructure having to accept any of the responsibility for safety.

11 Votes
 
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Aimy Thiessen 4 months ago

I like the safety of having a physical barrier of parked cars between myself and traffic downtown. It makes it easy to navigate a safe way to work and home through downtown.

11 Votes
 
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Bryan Silzer 4 months ago

As a driver I find these Bike Lanes Very Confusing and I have lived and drove in this city for 24 years. When I ride my bike downtown, again no idea on the concept, especially these big green boxes that seem to have you sitting out in traffic as a target. What percentage of drivers actually understand what that green box is? When I have out of town visitors, they avoid even driving downtown because of these bike lanes. When you read the Saskatchewan Drivers Handbook these are not even mentioned.

6 Votes
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Zack MacGregor 4 months ago

If your curious about the bike boxes here is the video from the city that explains them. https://youtu.be/9iUDkytI-5E?t=1m24s

3 Votes
 
 
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Shyan Jordison 4 months ago

I appreciate having designated bike lanes for cyclists in the city, I use the downtown lanes very regularly. I like the fact that the lanes are separated from traffic, the green zones are helpful in intersections, and the no turn on red signs on 23rd are helpful for making vehicle traffic more aware of cyclists.

12 Votes
 
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R Martin 4 months ago

These bike lanes have been one of the worse things the city has spent money on. Simply put, GET RID OF THEM!

6 Votes
 
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Jasmine Liska 4 months ago

I am a slow cyclist and, as such, I do not feel comfortable biking in traffic on most roads. I am harassed frequently (drivers have tailgated me to try to push me off the road, ridden their horns continuously for blocks, yelled at me, and even driven up onto the sidewalk to roar past me because I was following the law and biking on the road, rather than weaving in and out of the parking lane). In low-pedestrian areas, I usually ride on the sidewalk because I'm more comfortable riding at a walking/running pace than trying to deal with traffic. Because downtown is a high-pedestrian and high-traffic area, I generally avoided biking there. However, despite the problems, the bike lanes mean that I feel safe biking downtown. Riding in them is a much more positive experience than driving downtown or biking elsewhere. The non-protected bike lanes are just used as a "car door opening lane" or a "parking spot waiting area," so I won't use them for fear of getting doored. "Sharing the road" doesn't work if cyclists like me ride at 20km/h -- drivers here believe that every road is theirs to drive alone. However, the bike lanes mean I don't have to deal with any of that: I don't get harassed, I don't feel bad about having to go so slowly (with my asthmatic lungs and heavy old mountain bike), and I get to interact with other cyclists in a positive manner. I wish there was a more connected network of protected bike lanes like these.

13 Votes
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Lee Smith 4 months ago

Excellent comment, Jasmine! I wish I could vote for it twice. THIS is why we need safe cycling infrastructure.

7 Votes
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Jasmine Liska 4 months ago

Thanks!

2 Votes
 
 
 
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Caro Doi 4 months ago

I am a cyclist and driver. As a cyclist, the bike lanes feel safer than being in traffic and they also save commute time by providing a clear route. In cases where there is a bike lane that has no physical barrier between traffic, I notice that cars often choose to park or drive in the bike lane - they don't always see cyclists, even in designated bike lanes. With separated lanes, this happens less often.

As a driver, I find that the bike lanes keep the road clearer and it is more obvious where cyclists will be. Cycling makes sense for a lot of people in our community and I hope that we can find peaceful and respectful ways of making sure those people have room to get around the city.

13 Votes
 
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Marta Lieb 4 months ago

Bike lanes are good, but frankly is very underused, plus should be part a walk way not the driveway.

2 Votes
 
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Eithan Pillipow 4 months ago

Whats good about the Bike lanes? -These lanes are the beginning of a change. That change allows people to use alternative transportation in a safe way in our congested downtown core. -Connection to existing bike-ways and transportation hubs makes it make sense. -Ease of mind for people who are less experienced with biking on roadways instead of dangerously riding on the sidewalks, which is against a city bylaw. -Bikes don't slow traffic as they are separated -No right turn on Red lights along bike lanes, Safety improved for pedestrian, bike, vehicular traffic. -City is clearly showing support for an active lifestyle, improved health benefits. -Bike parking downtown is endless, free, and this helps you access that.

To everyone not commenting what they like about bike lanes i suggest you carefully re-read the topic and think about what you posted and hopefully realize how the other topic was much more appropriate for your thoughts.

11 Votes
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Crystal Dawn 4 months ago

You're right, the replies voicing complaints under this topic do not exactly answer "What do you like?". That said, the questions about a pilot project should be asked in a non-biased way, which these are not. Asking what people like and what could be improved leaves out the most important question, namely being whether the pilot project indicated it is a feasible/good project that should be expanded or not. The people voicing complaints under this topic clearly have noticed the bias in the questions and are voicing their opinions.

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Glenn Cassidy 4 months ago

What Do I Like? Nothing about them.

11 Votes
 
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H R Treimans 4 months ago

There is nothing I like about them. Get rid of them and save the tax payers money. Goodness knows the administration needs to learn to cut costs.

8 Votes
 
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H R Treimans 4 months ago

There is nothing I like about them!! GET rid of them.

11 Votes
 
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Matt Wolsfeld 4 months ago

I like that the bike lanes provide a safe way for cyclists to access and traverse the downtown. Many of my friends and family members are inexperienced or slow cyclists who have had many terrible experiences in town being dangerously passed or run off the road by angry drivers who do not like to drive behind them. Experiences like this reduce the likelihood that people like this will continue to bike in the city. The protection these lanes offer allows young, inexperienced, or nervous cyclists an opportunity to get around the city comfortably.

I also like that the lanes have allowed me to more easily interact with the downtown core as a cyclist/pedestrian. Many people complain about not being able to drive downtown due to parking concerns. These bike lanes make it incredibly easy for me to hop on my bike, quickly reach my destination, and hop off right in front of without any need for extended parking space. It has enabled me to start patronising more downtown businesses on a regular basis.

9 Votes
 
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Colleen Mackenzie 4 months ago

How you asked the question is biased and may be used to justify this pilot project. "What do we like about them?" should ask what is your opinion on the bike lanes. They have ruined the downtown for driving. I drive downtown at least once per week and have seen cyclists use the lanes maybe twice. 4th Avenue is a mess and now you can't turn right on a red at certain intersections. Oh wait, some intersections you can turn right on a red but yield to cyclists. Bad enough for experienced drivers to figure out, but new drivers or people new to the city? This was a terrible design and waste of money and needs to be scrapped.

8 Votes
 
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Dwayne Vandale 4 months ago

You never see people on bikes there I think all those bike lanes should be made into accessible parking for the disabled since there seems to be ZERO PARKING for us now

3 Votes
 
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Scott Colville 4 months ago

I enjoy having a dedicated spot to bike on the road where I am protected from traffic, and don't impede pedestrians or vehicle traffic.

8 Votes
 
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Blair Burnett 4 months ago

I like nothing about the bike lanes. And that is just my opinion. More lined up traffic.. No turns on reds which is bullsh!t.. because when the lights turn green you gotta wait for pedestrians to cross holding up more traffic. Change to a YIELD at least! Frick!

8 Votes
 
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Carol Jones 4 months ago

I like nothing about the bike lanes. They are too confusing for drivers and unsafe for cyclists. I almost ran into a cyclist when making a left turn into a parking lot; there were too many cars parked to even see that there was a bike lane there! The poles and lines, etc. make the downtown area look cluttered, confusing, and unsightly!! I rarely...and I mean RARELY see anyone cycling downtown in these lanes. Please get rid of them and leave the streets alone and save the taxpayers money!

9 Votes
 
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James Rassell 4 months ago

Bike lanes make it safer to ride downtown, which is exactly what the city should encourage. The less cars in the core, the better.

9 Votes
 
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Shelley Neufeld 4 months ago

I'm a relatively new cyclist but have also already had enough bad experience with drivers in the city that I am quite afraid to drive on the road with cars at all. Having dedicated paths and lanes Makes my commute so much easier and I feel safe.

9 Votes
 
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Erin Ed 4 months ago

I like using the downtown bike lanes. It makes riding downtown less intimidating.

8 Votes
 
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Chad Reynolds 4 months ago

I use 4th avenue as both a driver and cyclist everyday (I think it's important to note that drivers and cyclists aren't two different sets of people). When I'm cycling, I find it much more inviting (and safe) in the bike lanes, and when I'm driving I have no problems with it at all, except for where the street narrows just before 24th street, headed north. In my opinon, these 4 or 5 parking spots aren't worth the confusion and potential hazard and should be removed to allow for straight passage as a motorist, and safety for cyclists.

7 Votes
 
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Alvi Campos 4 months ago

I was out and about this past Monday collecting data for work. I walked every street in the downtown core and didn't notice a single cyclist using the lanes. The weather was nice and I was out from hours where there should have been a significant amount of cyclists; especially if the claims are that about 300 cyclists use the lanes on a daily basis. Unfortunately I think that this number is way off base and inaccurate. Furthermore, my office is located near the bike lanes and you see minimal to no traffic on these lanes during the summer, and almost no traffic in these lanes during the winter,

The notion or idea of the bike lanes was questionable from the start. The lack of use and the ineffectiveness of the lanes should force the removal of these lanes. Various studies throughout European cities also conclude that dedicated bike lanes aren't the solution for cyclists, pedestrians and drivers. If anything the City should explore reducing the speed limit downtown to 35-40 km/hr to provide better safety and comfort for cyclists, pedestrians and drivers.

As a taxpayer I do not want any more money being wasted on such a project. I would rather see my tax dollars put to better use; especially with the economic downturn we are witnessing. Reality is that an overwhelming amount of people drive to work downtown. The City should focus on the necessities of the majority and not the luxuries of the very few. If we are trying to be a "trendy" city that pleases the younger population, I don't think that introducing bike lanes is the answer.

7 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

I agree the speed limit should be reduced downtown and in residential neighbourhoods.

2 Votes
 
 
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Russ Neufeld 4 months ago

300 cyclists per day? In winter? Not a chance!!! Colossal waste of money...especially snow removal. Impedes traffic flow (no right turns). We'll need more police to give out useless right turn tickets.

6 Votes
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Mel Brockman, Researcher/Evaluator 4 months ago

300 cyclists per day is an average, meaning it's likely lower than that in the winter and higher in the spring/summer/fall.

1 Vote
 
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

...Not if people follow the rule?

0 Votes
 
 
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Susan Mak 4 months ago

Finding this "survey" was near impossible. The questions of this survey are biased. The bike lanes were put in as a pilot project, which by definition is a small scale preliminary study conducted in order to evaluate feasibility, time, cost, adverse events. Therefore, the first appropriate question to be asked at the end of a pilot project is whether the project is feasible, not what do you like about the project and how the project can be improved. I like nothing about the bike project. I think it is a waste of money at this time when we can ill afford it, this includes the costs of installation, signage and snow removal. The limited number of blocks involved does nothing to encourage cycling. Due to the width of our streets, this project causes traffic congestion, confusion to the motorists and gives rise to safety concerns to both motorists and cyclists and adds no appeal to our downtown. As a driver, I avoid 4th Avenue whenever possible. In some cities in Japan, bikes share the sidewalk successfully with pedestrains rather than the motorists. Before proceeding further, we need to do some low costs studies. The current pilot project seemed to have been imposed on us without very much consultation. I know lots of cyclists who avoid these bike lanes for various reasons. I do not believe that all cyclists support these lanes. We should not be governed by a few vocal activists.

9 Votes
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Russ Neufeld 4 months ago

Very well said. Survey is biased for sure.

3 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

IMO you are sort of being difficult. I'm pretty sure the point of the bike lanes are that if people used them then there would be less congestion. If it's causing congestion then maybe it won't take that much longer to bike for some people (or maybe less time and free parking also) and then again, less congestion. The amount of blocks they did was probably to keep it cheaper and less all-of-a-sudden. Yet, you want there to be more lanes because this small scale doesn't encourage biking but you also want there to be a low cost study (which is what this project is). I think the lanes do encourage biking to some people (including myself) and have made it way safer for groups of school kids that I see biking on them (doesn't that just tug your heart strings). Even if the bikes lanes save one kid's life, would that be worth it? If it was your kid or someone-you-love's kid, or even someones-you-hate's kid? If you're worried about governments doing things without your consultation I think this is on the lower end of the scale in terms of level of offensiveness. All cyclists might not support the lanes but I could imagine by projecting my own grievances with them that many nonsupporting cyclists aren't anti-bike lane but just have had bad experiences with drivers/parkers, poor maintenance, etc. That would suggest that we need to spend more time explaining the system and spend more money maintaining them. If I pay taxes for roads but don't own a car, shouldn't I get something for my money?

3 Votes
 
 
 
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Ira GeresCodd 4 months ago

What I like best about the bikes lanes is feeling as though I'm not going to get run over as much by cars on the road. I use them multiple times a week to either get downtown and to cross the Broadway bridge and those trips are safer than they were before the 4th ave. ones were there - especially at night when there are tons of drunk drivers on the roads. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxLdNZIQEro see, no bikes lanes

5 Votes
 
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Adrien Blais 4 months ago

I really appreciate being able to ride through downtown on protected bike lanes. It is nice to not have to worry about being hit from behind, doored, or sideswiped by vehicle trying to squeeze a pass in as you would with cycling within the driving lanes. The various parkade and alley access points do introduce the potential for vehicle / cyclist collisions, however I feel like there is a better chance for a cyclist to react to avoid such collisions and this could be mitigated with yield signs for vehicle traffic on all access points.

8 Votes
 
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Maeghan Carstairs admin 4 months ago

If you prefer, you may submit your comments to the Protected Bike Lane Demo Project coordinators at cycling@saskatoon.ca.

0 Votes
 
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Dave Palibroda 4 months ago

I love the protected bike lanes downtown. Sure they are not perfect but they are an amazing step forward. 4th Ave is the perfect North/South stretch through downtown connecting from Broadway and vice versa. 4th Avenue is a key stretch in the minimum bike grid that is required for Saskatoon. 4th Avenue used to be very dangerous to bike down the "exclusive" bike lane. The exclusive bike lane was a horrible piece of infrastructure that always had vehicles double parked in it, was unridable in winter and people biking were always a split second away from being doored.
The protected bike lane has pretty much eliminated all of my major safety concerns while biking through downtown.
I love that I now often seen kids biking downtown using the protected bike lanes.
Year around the 4th Avenue protected bike lane is by far the best part of my daily commute.

7 Votes
 
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Rod Bell 4 months ago

I like that Saskatoon is looking for a solution to accommodate various modes of transportation, but as someone who works on 4th Avenue, it is clear to me the bike lane experiment is a failure. The level of vehicle traffic on 4th street requires two car lanes in either direction. It is dangerous to exit a parkade when you must advance partially through a bike lane and then stop so that you can merge into the oncoming traffic. It is also very dangerous to turn right on a green light as it is unnatural to have to shoulder check over your right shoulder to see if a cyclist is passing. The cyclists headed straight through an intersection are moving much faster than the car that is turning right, so to make the turn safely you need to be certain that there is a lot of clearance between your car and the next cyclist. It is only a matter of time before a very serious injury occurs. Accidents will happen, but predictable accidents should be avoided.

2 Votes
 
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Brodie Thompson 4 months ago

I'm a pedestrian, a cyclist, and a motorist. I like that the bike lanes provide an alternative to driving for people on bikes. These are people that would not otherwise consider riding a bike downtown if they were required to mix with cars. Less single-occupant cars on the road create less congestion and results in less damage to the pavement. I want a vibrant, healthy downtown. Over 50% of the surface area in the Central Business district is dedicated to moving people around in cars (that includes parking lots and road surfaces). People don't come downtown to hang out in a gravel Impark lot.

I also like the connection that the 4th Ave bike lane creates with Broadway (I wish that the 4th Ave lane would have extended to 25th). I regularly use this connection.

Lastly, and pardon the sarcasm, I would like to thank all the naysayers for sharing your anecdotal "bike traffic studies" (e.g., "I was downtown at one very specific location at a single instant in time and I didn't see anyone on a bike!"). There are actual traffic counting devices at many locations along the bike lanes. I think I'll trust the data that the City is collecting. We seem to trust that data for vehicle traffic counts.

6 Votes
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Mel Brockman, Researcher/Evaluator 4 months ago

As a counterpoint to those who think no one is using these bike lanes, this morning I was the fifth person in line to get in the 23rd St bike lane at Idylwyld. Yes, let's rely on the City's data, as we can't possibly know how much the bike lanes are being used based on our own personal observations.

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greg newman 4 months ago

I find the bike lanes ill-conceived and unsafe. It seems to me any north-south bike traffic should use the pathway along the river and then at the appropriate location, head west to their destination along the much less busy east-west streets. Leave the north-south avenues for cars. Also, there is a serious safety issue in that in the winter, car drivers can't read the cryptic green paint instructions painted on the roads as its covered by snow. Even worse, is that in order to try and read and understand the unconventional bike lane instructions that are posted on poles, the car drivers are forced to drive VERY distracted. It may be that local drivers will come to know what these signs all mean but there are lots of visitors to town who will never understand the signage in the time they have while driving along, and they could be at a greater risk to hurt a cyclist - which is unfair to both them and the cyclist!

If the city insists on keeping this program, which I hope they do not, then consider moving the north-south bike lanes to 2nd avenue. Take a little depth off the angled parking and put the bike lanes between it and the curb. Consider making the sidewalk a little narrower if needed. Second avenue is not a traditional high traffic flow route through downtown so moving the bike lanes there will impact a lot fewer people and keep traffic moving at the start and end of the work day.

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Jason FC 4 months ago

What I like about the bike lanes… Nothing.

In my opinion they have been poorly thought out, poorly implemented and are being forced into an downtown traffic situation very poorly suited to them. They don’t reduce traffic congestion they increase it by shutting down right turns and a creating choke points at every intersection by removing what amounts to an entire lane and making entering from a parkade or lot an exercise in frustration.

They create dangerous situations for people exiting their cars both on the drivers side where drivers are forced to exit into traffic and on the passengers side where people are force to exit into the bike lane (which is actually not so bad because there’s never any bikes). The posts are also too low making them difficult to see and causing people to hit them with their cars.

The lanes markings are horrible in summer where a driver has to constantly jog to the left or to the right to stay in their lane and invisible in winter which creates a complete gong show where people have to guess regarding their lane.

They were expensive to install, they are expensive to maintain and under utilized. Why they city is pandering to a microscopic demographic of cyclists I have no idea. They have completely disrupted downtown traffic flow for 300 cyclists while causing traffic issues for the 40,000+ drivers (I’m guessing) using the same route daily. For what? So they can say we have downtown bike lanes?

If the City wants to improve cycling safety my suggestion is to remove the lanes and instead start enforcing traffic laws and ticketing cyclists. Running lights, illegal turns, riding on the wrong side of the street, riding on the side walk, riding three abreast, obstructing traffic… you name it, I see it… daily.

And a tip for cyclists. If you don’t feel safe because of traffic… don’t ride in traffic. If Broadway Ave doesn’t feel safe at rush hour maybe try Eastlake. Don’t ride on Clarence between 8th and College. If you have to go one block out of your way to avoid disrupting traffic and putting yourself in harms way. Do it.

And just a heads up, riding up a bridge at 10km/h at 5pm is not helping to build a positive relationship between cyclists and drivers… just saying

A little common sense goes a long way.

4 Votes
 
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Mel Brockman, Researcher/Evaluator 4 months ago

I echo all the comments about how the protected bike lanes make me feel more comfortable/safer when cycling than when I have to ride in car lanes/traffic. I actually go 2 blocks out of my way in order to use the 23rd St lane to go to work. Ideally cyclists could use car lanes, but the problem is that you annoy drivers if you aren't over to the right far enough so they can safely pass, yet you run the risk of getting doored if you move too far to the right. Also, ideally cyclists could go everywhere they need to go using quieter routes, but there are limitations to that because it can add a lot of extra travel time, and like motorists, cyclists are often looking to get from point A to point B as quickly as possible.

I've read through all the comments and it seems to me that there is common ground between cyclists and motorists (I am both): to be able to commute in the city safely and efficiently. I think we should operate from that assumption so that we can move past the never-ending us vs. them mentality when it comes to protected bike lanes. Let's work together to identify the good and the bad and make improvements.

To those who don't like the bike lanes, I implore you to suggest viable solutions other than getting rid of them entirely. The research is pretty clear that protected bike lanes have many benefits for a city, so the onus is on you to provide compelling counter-evidence, not simply state how stupid/annoying/pointless they are just because it's not your chosen mode of travel.

6 Votes
 
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Jason FC 4 months ago

I don’t believe most people are opposed to bike lanes, but I do believe most people are opposed to the approach that the city has taken which is essentially pounding a round peg into a square hole. And when they see it doesn’t fit… pound it some more.

They city is determined to make this “work” (when it obviously has not) no matter the detrimental effect on traffic flow or the cost. At this point I believe the number is $300,000 for the “pilot” implementation and $150,000 a year for maintenance. Ridiculous numbers when the city is currently struggling with reduced funding.

This “successful” pilot currently consists of A compromised and disrupted traffic flow, Thousands of angry and frustrated drivers, Dangerous and confusing driving conditions Unsustainable maintenance costs A major traffic artery that resembles a slalom course Loss of parking and associated revenue (the new paint scheme suggests a loss of approx 1.5 cars worth of parking at every lot or street entrance onto 4th)(in the summer at least… in the winter it’s back to the gong show) A public relations policy designed around downplaying or ignoring all of the above

And

A very small handful of cyclists who feel safer

Don’t get me wrong, I understand where the lane proponents are coming from. I’ve cycled in Saskatoon for 30 years including commuting from Varsity View to the North Industrial during the summers and traffic/safety can be a concern, but it’s not the only concern nor are protected lanes the only answer.

3 Votes
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Mel Brockman, Researcher/Evaluator 4 months ago

I've recently started using the 23rd St bike lane to get to work and, given the many comments in this thread about disrupted traffic flow, I've been making an effort to watch traffic on 4th Ave. I am not trying to dismiss others' observations of disruption, but I honestly haven't seen any evidence of backed up traffic on 4th Ave - maybe people are re-routing? I'd be curious to see if the City is measuring this.

One of the other major criticisms of the bike lanes is, as you've pointed out, the cost and that it's too expensive/not justified given the number of people who are using them as well as our current financial climate. I fail to understand the argument that a couple hundred thousand dollars a year is too expensive when millions/billions are spent on roads and bridges every year (which cyclists pay for through taxes, I might add). It really is a drop in the proverbial bucket. People argue that bike lanes are pointless/a waste of money because no one uses them. Yet survey data has shown that Saskatonians would bike more if they felt safer on the streets. So what better solution than protected bike lanes? Yes, cyclists represent a minority of the road share in Saskatoon, but the question is whether bike commutes are increasing and whether it's partly because of the bike lanes. Commuting by bike in Saskatoon is a cultural paradigm shift that will not happen overnight. Let's see if they're increasing cycling rates. More bikes and less cars on the road has to save money in the long run in terms of infrastructure and maintenance costs, given the relative scales of the infrastructure needed (e.g. a bike lane vs. a bridge).

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Ellen Quigley 4 months ago

This thread is upsetting to read at times. Although many of the comments are representative of the kind of openminded live-and-let-live attitude I associate with Saskatoon, there is a lot of hostility (on both sides) in these comments as well. As per some of the other commentators, I hope we can listen to one another enough to have a reasonable discussion about this. I would also agree that traffic does not seem to be any worse than it was prior to the bike lanes' installation (traffic has been worse in general in the past 10 years, we should remember), and the expense is not proportionate to the mode share (as in, if 2% of Saskatonians are cyclists, bike infrastructure spending should probably equal 2% of the transportation budget, right? But it doesn't even come close).

I think some of the complaints are really about the particular form this experiment took. For vehicles, the white poles are not visible enough and neither is the signage. Unfortunately for cyclists, the number of white poles splayed across the road or bent at odd angles might actually make people think the lanes are not particularly safe; I suspect quite a few more people would use those bike lanes if there were a real physical barrier in place (a curb, potted plants, etc., as they do elsewhere). I understand that the city had to do something temporarily, but I think it's important to remember that this will not necessarily predict the number of people who will feel safe cycling when there is a real barrier in place. However, there does also have to be visibility for vehicles so that we can make the downtown safe for everyone, and I can see how the current situation could be frustrating for drivers. For cyclists, it is frustrating that the bike lane peters out before 25th -- that's really not the point of a bike lane (to force a merge with traffic randomly where no one is going to have reached their destination). Again, that may be keeping numbers below where they would be with bike lanes traversing all of downtown.

In short, the current pilot is not ideal, although the City surely did their best given the constraints of a temporary set-up. I hope that drivers and cyclists alike will see the potential in a project like this, despite the flaws in its current form; it will help decrease traffic for everyone (bikes take up a lot less space than cars, both when moving and when parked), improve air quality for all, and bring Saskatoon into the 21st century (most other cities have things like these, even with fewer cyclists per capita than we have).

4 Votes
 
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Katya MacDonald 4 months ago

I very much appreciate the protected lanes as a first step towards stronger, more functional, safer cycling infrastructure in the city. The lanes make more of downtown more accessible to a broader range of cyclists, which in the end will free up parking downtown and encourage active transportation as a response to environmental issues as well.

From my personal perspective as a cyclist using the lanes, I feel safer and more visible having my own space apart from general traffic, and it is valuable to observe how the bike lanes in fact keep traffic flowing more steadily, because each type of vehicle has the space to travel at their own pace without interfering with each other.

3 Votes
 
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Robert Judge 4 months ago

If the protected bike lanes save one life, they are well worth the space, cost and time spent getting used to. Studies in other cities show that this kind of bike lane makes the street safer for ALL users, whether they cycle, walk or drive.

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R Martin 3 months ago

There is nothing to like about these bike lanes

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Ron Ritchie 3 months ago

Nothing good about this project. As a bike rider I believe this project was ill conceived likely by someone who doesn't riding on a regular basis . Bike riders should be much better educated and share the road. We could really use a large central bike vale downtown easily accessible from the current bike paths along the river bank. Perhaps adjacent to the Bess. Those that are capable of riding their bike to downtown can surely walk from there to their destination if they are uncomfortable or not a seasoned enough rider to ride in traffic.

1 Vote
 
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Nat Morien 3 months ago

I don't often bike downtown but when I do for work or pleasure purposes it is slick to be able to ride down 4th Avenue without being in the barrage of traffic. I like how the bike pathway has been angled towards the car lane at the lights so that drivers are more cognizant that you are there. I do also find it more challenging to park in and around the 4th Avenue area and agree that the number of physical parking spaces have declined. Am guessing that the City of Saskatoon investigated numerous other centres both in Canada, US and Europe to see how they incorporate bike lanes?

1 Vote
 
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Tony Sweet 3 months ago

I use the bike lanes instead of taking a shorter route that would involve much more traffic. I like having a designated lane for bikes. I feel more comfortable that I'm not holding up a lane of traffic or being squeezed.

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Brynn HarrisHamm 3 months ago

I like that the City wants to make it easier for cyclists to get around, but I feel other streets, such as Spadina, are more suitable for the lanes. 4th Ave is all wrong and traffic has really been messed up.

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Lyle Schweighardt 3 months ago

As someone who has spent a significant amount of time as a pedestrian, cyclist, and a driver in Saskatoon, I feel I may have some input on the subject.

We have laws in place that allow cyclists and drivers to share the roads. These have been in place for a long time. PEOPLE NEED TO OBEY THESE LAWS. If they did, there would be no need for bike lanes.

Too many drivers who couldn't care less about the safety of cyclists on the road(they are, or at least were considered traffic). And too many cyclist think the size and mobility of their bike gives them the right to circumvent the rules by zigzagging through traffic and whipping through traffic lights.

Why don't we just punish the offenders and stop trying to legislate to protect the stupid and unlawful?

For those that might question my commitment here, I have, while LAWFULLY riding my bike, been the victim of a STUPID driver to the tune of many many months of physio to attempt recover from a broken back.

I'm all for making the city a safer place, but it has to start between the ears of the people that utilize the roads and sidewalks otherwise it no amount of bike lanes will make anything safer.

1 Vote
 
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Pam Gaunt 3 months ago

I feel that these bike lanes are nothing but dangerous. Driver's are to yield to cyclists, however, doing it safely is many times difficult for these reasons: - on making a right turn and yielding, I find that with the speed of some cyclists they are popping up out of blind spots, which makes it only a matter of time that someone may not have enough time to brake - along with the above, the lanes are so congested now that it is difficult to watch everthing safely - even when driving with great caution. It has made it more diffucult and frustrating to navigate down town and watch the traffic safely let alone throwing in watching for cyclists. - will I get used to this? not sure, as I haven't so far. I believe that I will simply start avoiding downtown as much as possible.

1 Vote
 
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Kevin Dunbar 3 months ago

I ride to work downtown all year round and I have for a decade. The protected bike lanes are a massive improvement over the previous lanes on 4th.

I really like the dedicated street space for cyclists, I don't find cars double parked and stopped in the current lanes, which occurred on about 1/2 my rides with the old bike lanes. Drivers lack of respect for unprotected bike lanes can be still seen on the southbound section of the lanes between 19th and 20th streets, I often see cars still driving in that section of bike lane.

I like the positioning of the lanes such that dooring is not a concern. With the old lanes I had to ride on the dividing line between the car and bike lanes to stay far enough from the parked cars which meant being passed by cars with only inches to spare, most of the bike lanes in the city are so narrow and close to parked cars it is impossible to ride in them without the constant risk of a driver or passenger opening the door into me or the people I'm riding with. I have had multiple drivers open the door on me. I used to cringe watching people riding beside parked cars because I know that drivers do not watch for a cyclist before opening the door and I don't want to see someone die because of it.

I like that my wife feels more comfortable riding with me using the bike lane. She doesn't ride nearly as much as I do and is the perfect target for these lanes. My wife does not like trying to share the road with large amounts of traffic, and especially with the harassment that can come from being forced to bike with cars. With the current lanes she is not worried about drivers honking/yelling/revving the engine because the cars are separated away from bikes. The protected lane means no driver can complain about being held up by a cyclist, they cannot try to harass or force the cyclist out of their way. I feel my wife is safer with the protected lanes compared to the old bike lanes. I love that the current protected bike lanes have some issues but encourages riding from a much larger and more diverse group of people with a larger range of cycling abilities.

I like the fact that the lanes are cleared in winter making them usable, most of the bike lanes disappear in winter.

1 Vote
 
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Jonathan Sinclair 3 months ago

I don't cycle as much as I used to, but I have never been uncomfortable riding in traffic downtown as the speeds are never that high. With most cars having to stop every block or two, they rarely exceed 50 kmh. College Dr, 22nd St, and Idlewyld are very different stories, those are what need more attention. From the perspective of a motorist, the protected lanes pose greater risk, as right turning traffic can unintentionally cutoff a fast moving cyclist. Opening doors also create unnecessary danger. Shoulder checking won't always be enough as a bike moving at 30-40 kmh won't be in the field of view until it is too late.

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Wilf Martin 3 months ago

This is the worst decision to put these bike lanes in the city has ever made. This was pressure from a very few people and I refuse to have my tax money wasted on this project or the maintenance on them which I understand is very high. If these few wish cycle lane have them pay for them. We are in a financial crunch now in the city and this type of spending must stop. Try an actual vote and see where this goes. No where

1 Vote
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Mel Brockman, Researcher/Evaluator 3 months ago

Less than 1% of the transportation budget is "very high"? "Have them pay for them"? We do. It's called paying taxes. When's the last time you paid out of pocket for maintenance on the roads you drive on every day?

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Paul Thompson 3 months ago

I cycle as my main mode of transportation about 7 months a year. Often, I am towing my daughter behind me in a trailer for our daily commute. I like that the bike lanes downtown are separated from traffic. This makes biking for families feasible in the downtown core. I personally never cycle on sidewalks in pedestrian areas, and I certainly don’t feel safe cycling in traffic with a child; the protected lanes are the only way for me to access the downtown when cycling with my family.

Dedicated cycling infrastructure is an essential part of a modern city. While I agree that the current pilot project is deeply flawed, the pursuit of proper, separate cycling infrastructure shows that the city is serious about creating an urban space for the 21st century. If we want to create economic growth by attracting young, skilled professionals to our city, having a variety of transportation options that include safe cycling is a must.

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Terry Sobieski 3 months ago

I am not in favour of the bike lanes. Traffic is congested enough in the down town without adding an additional hindrance and barriers. My work takes me across the downtown at various times during the work day and I very seldom see anyone using the lanes. Also the cost of maintenance, snow removal in the winter and lost parking stalls and turning restrictions far out weigh any benefit to the majority of residents or individuals accessing the downtown. Also if bikers want dedicated lanes and they do go ahead then bikers should be required to licence their bikes and contribute financially to their creation and maintenance. It should not be a free ride on the backs of all taxpayers, User pay!

2 Votes
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Mel Brockman, Researcher/Evaluator 3 months ago

"Contribute financially to their creation and maintenance." Uh, yeah, we do - it's called paying taxes. Should motorists have to pay out of pocket for road creation and maintenance?

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Kim Sutherland 3 months ago

Having witnessed an accident involving a cyclist and having nearly being in an accident myself on a separate occasion, I will say that I feel these lanes are unsafe. I'm not sure what the solution is. Other than the accident I witnessed and the close call I have never seen anyone else in the lanes, so I may be biased, but statistically speaking that is two times too many. I do know that I avoid the downtown areas with these lanes now.

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Chris Pequin 3 months ago

I have no use for these bike lanes. stop using up valuable car space. I hardly ever see anyone using bike lanes and adjusting traffic patterns and laws in order to accommodate an activity that only happens in the spring and summer. I also see very few people using sidewalks around most of the city. Why not just allow cyclists to use the sidewalks with Pedestrians having the right of way. Roads are built for cars, and trucks.

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Tyson McShane 3 months ago

I really appreciate that it provides a useful cycling route where I don't have to worry about aggressive drivers, or feel like I am in the way of car drivers. It is amazing how much less stressful it is to ride in the protected bike lane, than it is to ride with car traffic. That is a great thing. It is also great that it provides a space in the downtown where I can feel comfortable biking with my children.

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Jeff Keyes 3 months ago

I am pleased that as a city we are attempting to accommodate vehicles and bicycles. It seems currently we have placed them at odds with one another rather than allowing a safe and effective co-existence especially during winter months. It is important that we have good access for all forms of transportation in the city. I believe we can do better then the bike lanes we have currently.

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Russ Deptuch 3 months ago

As a motorist, there is absolutely nothing I like about them, driving lanes have been eliminated, lost parking stalls, I've yet to see anyone use one of these lanes, the cost attached to maintaining them through the summer and winter far outweighs the benefits of a minimal numbers of riders.

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Dave Palibroda 3 months ago

I really like all of the recent changes that the City has implemented this June. ie. Allowing right turns on red, creating a straight line in the right vehicle lanes, adding additional signage etc. They seem to alleviate a lot of the biggest concerns people have. Thank you City of Saskatoon for listening to the real concerns/issues and making continual improvements.

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Dave Palibroda 3 months ago

I also really like how easy it is for me to bike downtown and support my favourite downtown businesses. The bike lanes are a great way to get into downtown easily, safely and directly. They are a great main artery (especially 4th) and allow me to easily branch off to head to my favourite shops. Where I always get a great spot right out front of the door and never have to worry about paying for parking or worry about getting a ticket. The extra money/time saved by biking increases the amount I have to spend and the stress free bike ride down the bike lanes usually has me leaving downtown with a big smile on my face.

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Peter Gallen 3 months ago

I like the separated bike lanes (cycle tracks) that provide a safe space for leisurely cyclists like myself. They are absolutely necessary for inexperienced cyclists like my young grandson and for all other people who are afraid to take up cycling because they otherwise have to cycle among quite deadly motor vehicles on the street. The frequent use of sidewalks for cycling is an indication to me that more, not less, separated cycle tracks are indeed needed. It is true that many experienced cyclists avoid the separated cycle tracks and prefer to ride in car traffic; that is quite an acceptable choice of theirs as they obviously do not feel they need the separated tracks; but the tracks are not really meant for them and they should, therefore, not dictate that other cyclists must do as they do. The main problem with the current tracks is that there are much too few of them downtown and that they are not well-enough connected to the shared paths on the bridges and to the rest of the cycling network in Saskatoon. They are, however, an important start and need to be rapidly expanded into a working network! As a comment to some motorist complaints in this forum, setting aside a small amount of street space for cyclists is not unreasonable in order to allow these taxpaying citizens a way to get around in the downtown safely without a car. However, instead of separated sidewalks, cycle tracks and vehicle lanes, we could of course set the general speed limit on all streets in the city to 10 km/hr and thus share the entire street space safely between pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and the occasional street-hockey game (as has actually been done in certain jurisdictions), but I think all of us would be more inconvenienced by that alternative.

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rahatjan kira judge 3 months ago

I agree 100%

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rahatjan kira judge 3 months ago

I would love to see the bike lanes becoming permanent. Protected cycling infrastructure helps to reduce health care cost, air pollution and reduce traffic congestion. In addition they improve quality of life by reducing crime rate, community feeling and belonging.

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