Please provide your feeback about the protected bike lanes project. 

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What do you like most about the protected bike lanes? 

75 Responses

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Catherine Shore at May 16, 2017 at 3:30pm CDT

I like the physical barrier between traffic and the curb to protect me when I ride.

17 Votes
 
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Lee Smith at May 16, 2017 at 4:20pm CDT

I like how comfortable it is riding in the bike lanes compared to with traffic. Cyclists are a lot closer in form and function to pedestrians than to vehicles, and having the cycling space adjacent to the pedestrian space, protected from vehicles, reflects that.

13 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 10:41am CDT

I disagree with cyclists being closer to pedestrians. When I go between 20-50km/hr down any given roadway in the city my speed is much closer in ratio to a car than a pedestrian.

1 Vote
 
 
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Jeff Schoffer at May 16, 2017 at 4:29pm CDT

I like absolutely nothing about these lanes. They take up parking. They prevent right turns on Red Lights. Going from two lanes to one causes traffic jams. The lanes aren't marked and you can't see which lane you should be in during winter. Please remove these useless lanes and let traffic flow like it should.

18 Votes
 
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Tom Poole at May 16, 2017 at 5:05pm CDT

I don't like anything about the downtown protected bike lanes, because: fewer parking spots; can only turn right when pedestrians are in crosswalk; dangerous for passengers exiting vehicle; businesses clear snow into bike lanes (no other option); poor traffic flow with single lanes; 4th Ave - zig-zag lanes, and can't see lanes in winter; I do not believe there are 300 bikes per day - I rarely (if ever!) see bikes in downtown bike lanes. Make 2nd Ave for bikes and pedestrians only, no vehicles - already very restricted street. Bike lanes need to be planned for NEW streets, restricted on busy downtown streets. Bring back scramble corners.

13 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 10:45am CDT

I like your idea about 2nd Ave bring a pedestrian street. I disagree with rest, I think what you are describing is unwillingness to change an outdated system.

0 Votes
 
 
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Jeanna South at May 16, 2017 at 5:13pm CDT

I like that I can safely bike to downtown activities with my eight-year-old, like the library. The bike lanes give people another choice for safe transportation.

11 Votes
 
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Cora Janzen at May 16, 2017 at 5:21pm CDT

I like the safety/protection that these provide and also it is clear of where I am supposed to be in the lane (people cycling have an assigned space). I love seeing more females, youth and parents with children cycling in these lanes (this is a sign of safety and comfort of the infrastructure) and coming to/through downtown on bike.

12 Votes
 
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CD Poilievre at May 16, 2017 at 5:31pm CDT

I agree they provide safety for bikers but they are annoying for drivers and should be removed. Driving downtown is already a bit of a nightmare with the trains and the shortage of parking without complicating things more with these bike lanes. Seems like a real poor use of civic dollars.

12 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:09pm CDT

so you agree they are safer but them removed because they are annoying...

1 Vote
 
 
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Rhonda Kincade at May 16, 2017 at 5:51pm CDT

Sorry but these lanes are way too underutilized to be worthwhile. Would be great if we didn't have 8 months of winter per year.

15 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:11pm CDT

Hop on a bike and go for a ride you might like it.

1 Vote
 
 
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Erin Spinney at May 16, 2017 at 5:56pm CDT

I really like the bike lane on 4th because of how it connects to the Broadway bridge when coming downtown. I no longer feel like I'm going to have to dart out into traffic to dodge car doors opening. I also like that I am protected from traffic, though I think that a more permanent barrier (flower pots would be lovely) than the white poles would help, because they get knocked off or bent over into the bike lane often.

11 Votes
 
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Joseph McDonald at May 16, 2017 at 5:56pm CDT

Primarily I like that these lanes provide much needed familiarity for drivers and cyclists alike in the city with regards to how to use and drive around protected bike lanes. I think that this is a great pilot project that highlights that the city definitely could benefit from protected bike lanes, but there is much room for improvement.

The things I particularly like about the lanes is how comfortable I feel when riding in them. I normally ride in traffic (daily commuter all year round) and on the occasions when I have a reason to use the lanes I find them to feel a lot safer and I have far less concern with regards to getting doored, getting flipped off, honked at , or yelled at. It makes for a far more relaxing ride and highlights why I think protected lanes are important.

11 Votes
 
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Scott Theede at May 16, 2017 at 6:17pm CDT

I really like lane coming off the Broadway Bridge heading North. I enjoy the protection from getting doored accidentally by drivers.

11 Votes
 
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Blaine Gysler at May 16, 2017 at 7:26pm CDT

Are use the lane on fourth Avenue regularly, and I even go out of my way to use it because I feel so much more comfortable and relaxed away from cars. I am surprised that so many car drivers are upset about them. You would think they would like us to be out of their way.

10 Votes
 
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George Singler at May 16, 2017 at 9:24pm CDT

i think it is a real waste of tax $ mostly in winter months but at anytime of the year it is not used as much as it would be by cars

9 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:12pm CDT

you have the power to help change that.

1 Vote
 
 
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Crystal Dawn at May 16, 2017 at 10:18pm CDT

I don't like anything about the bike lanes. I am an avid cycler and I go out of my way to avoid the streets with bike lanes. They are a waste of money and cause more trouble than they are worth in our congested downtown.

12 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:13pm CDT

so you feel safer biking on the road rather than in the bikes lanes?

0 Votes
 
 
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Bert B at May 16, 2017 at 10:21pm CDT

The protected bike lanes are a great step toward a multimodal transportation system in the city. For me these are the safest and most comfortable way to travel on a bike. Saskatoon has a higher per capita percentage of cyclists than many Canadian cities. Similar projects have proven successful in so many other Canadian and international winter cities. I'm happy that Saskatoon is joining the party.

9 Votes
 
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Bruce Howlett at May 16, 2017 at 10:31pm CDT

There is no doubt that Saskatoon needs bike lanes, however downtown Saskatoon was not designed with them in mind and there is simply no room for them unless city council is willing to spend some major cash and make some tough decisions to make the room. Any new development like River Landing should require room for cyclists on the roads. There will never be complete harmony between cyclists and motor vehicles. Let's face it, vehicles do things that annoy cyclists and cyclists do things that annoy drivers. Then there are the pedestrians who don't know what the flashing hand means. The no right turn on red is putting pedestrians and cyclists at risk because drivers that have already waited through a light where they could easily have proceeded safely on a red light, are not going to wait through a second light. They are going to crowd the crosswalk and block the bike lane to their right to make sure they get through that green light. That's simple observation while moving around downtown. I also do not see the rationale behind no right turn on the red light. A cyclist coming from my left through a green light is visible enough that there should not be problem yielding to them just as you would a vehicle. There should not be a cyclist coming from the right unless they are on the wrong side of the street going against the bike lane flow. The cyclist that's actually in danger is the one moving quickly from behind and to the right as both the cyclist and the driver turning right move to make it through while the light is green. Get rid of the no right turn on red light. It is not serving any useful purpose.

3 Votes
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Lee Smith at May 17, 2017 at 2:52pm CDT

Saskatoon has some of the widest downtown streets of any Canadian city. There is plenty of room. Also, the downtown was not designed with cars and trucks in mind, either (it wasn't "designed" at all, it just developed naturally). Many other cities (including winter cities) have gotten this right; are we so arrogant to assume that best practices don't apply to us?

Additionally, the "no right on red" isn't for cyclists approaching from the left, it's for the green bike boxes at the corners, where cyclists are supposed to wait for green lights.

6 Votes
 
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 8:38am CDT

The no right turn is because there are the green boxes for cyclists to wait in so they don't have to leave the bike lane and go into traffic to make left hand turns. I disagree with your ability to rationalize people disregarding them.

1 Vote
 
 
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Larry Williams at May 16, 2017 at 10:38pm CDT

So we are going to inconvenience 300,000+ citizens to satisfy 300. Scrap the program. As I recall when visiting Vienna, the bike lanes were incorporated into the sidewalks/boulevards and not the streets. 4th Avenue is a virtual disaster for motorists - from the drivers side exiting the vehicle into an oncoming traffic lane and from the passenger side exiting the vehicle into the bike lane (of course that may not be a problem as few people use the bike lanes).

11 Votes
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Lee Smith at May 17, 2017 at 2:54pm CDT

How you saw it in Vienna is an example of excellent cycling infrastructure. Which means it's also very expensive. It would be great to have that kind of thing in Saskatoon eventually, but we have to start small and cheap with pilot projects like this.

4 Votes
 
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 10:35am CDT

Inconveniencing 300,000 is extreme hyperbole. If driving is so hard downtown, try using the bike lanes, they are very convenient and fun to ride in. Especially on a nice summer day.

1 Vote
 
 
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Marilyn Plant at May 16, 2017 at 11:22pm CDT

These lanes are not used enough to warrant cost of maintaining them. Also a bike is a vehicle and as such should be licensed and follow ALL rules of the road which very few do. Get rid of the lanes completely

4 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:25pm CDT

that's not bikers' fault that is SGI not providing that option likely because they are too easy to steal. I would love to license my bike for theft and for accidents but then what about children? Do 3 year old kids need one on their bike and if not then do you write them a ticket? Do you then have to have a drivers license for a bike? There are very few drivers who follow the rules of the road although I agree and there are bikers who do dumb things too. If you could license your bike would drivers then give bikers more respect on the road?

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Marilyn Plant at May 16, 2017 at 11:25pm CDT

I like nothing about them. Get rid of them. Too costly to maintain for a select few, small percentage of population

4 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:26pm CDT

help change that! (buy a bike)

1 Vote
 
 
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Dawn Ginter at May 17, 2017 at 12:02am CDT

I work downtown and walk the streets on my breaks. My daily walking route includes 2 streets with bike lanes. I have only seen 1 biker on the 23rd st. Lane so far this year. It was full of ice and snow most of the winter. And the damage to vehicles from ramming into those posts is crazy. They are so hard to see! I've seen more car/pole accidents than ive seen bikers use the lanes. Also, from my many downtown walks I have noticed that a lot of our sidewalks are very wide. Perhaps wide enough to fit 1 lane for pedestrians and 1 lane for bikers. Some landscaping adjustments may have to be done, but I think this would be a much safer and useful space to use than our tiny downtown streets.

6 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 10:38am CDT

Interesting you have only seen one biker on the path, as I have used it 50 times+ already this year. Do you think cyclists going 30-40 km down a sidewalk would be safe?

1 Vote
 
 
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Theo Julian at May 17, 2017 at 1:59am CDT

Active Transportation is a vital imperative to every growing community. Cycling is a big part of active transportation. Car oriented design no longer works for modern cities. I hope Saskatoon can evolve beyond the car and include cycling routes for all ages and abilities.
Alternatively, we can follow the path of car proliferation and choose against active transportation/cycling..Why not ! It worked for Detroit right ?

7 Votes
 
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Jennifer Kitchen at May 17, 2017 at 6:37am CDT

These bike lanes are a nightmare - very confusing for drivers! I can't imagine being a new driver trying to navigate my way around them. PLEASE get rid of them asap.

3 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:29pm CDT

buy a bike and go for a ride Jennifer Kitchen :-) it could help you understand them. many young people millenialscough* are doing that these days so it might be less of a problem than you think :-)

0 Votes
 
 
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Susan Bonnor at May 17, 2017 at 9:47am CDT

I like the idea of protected bike lanes but they are not practical in the locations they have been placed. I don't think the costs associated with the upkeep and changes to traffic patterns is worth it for the few months that most people would be utilizing them. There are very few people utilizing them in the winter months. The marked bike lanes along other streets without the posts seem to work well.

3 Votes
 
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Dwight Doering at May 17, 2017 at 10:02am CDT

The "protected" bike lanes are a hazard for all concerned. Pedestrians have to cross active traffic to get to their parked vehicles. Cyclists and motor vehicles are both at risk. I was travelling north on 4th Ave. on May 1. I saw a cyclist traveling at speed in the bike lane and a SUV was turning off of 4th into the parking area under Sturdy Stone. As the SUV crossed the bike lane the cyclist slammed into the rear quarter panel of the SUV denting it and falling to the ground. There was no way that the driver of the SUV could see the cyclist coming because of the cars parked along 4th. The whole thing is a disaster waiting to happen and what I saw is a prime example.

9 Votes
 
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Andrew Wallace at May 17, 2017 at 10:27am CDT

I like that cyclists are being given a dedicated, protected space in which to ride. I like that Saskatoon is finally implementing this common-sense approach, which has already been successfully proven in many other cities, like Vancouver, Ottawa, Montreal, to name ones I have recently seen.

6 Votes
 
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Zack MacGregor at May 17, 2017 at 10:38am CDT

I like the idea of the bike lanes. It's nice to have a lane that is safe to ride in. I ride the full length of the 4th ave bike lane every day to work and back home. I like to see the city trying to modernize and offer alternatives to driving. Car culture here is very strong and it's hard to change opinions about active transportation.

It's nice that the onus of safety isn't being pushed exclusively onto cyclists. So many other cities are pushing for cyclists to be forced to wear helmets and hi-vis, etc, without any other road user group or infrastructure having to accept any of the responsibility for safety.

7 Votes
 
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Aimy Thiessen at May 17, 2017 at 10:43am CDT

I like the safety of having a physical barrier of parked cars between myself and traffic downtown. It makes it easy to navigate a safe way to work and home through downtown.

5 Votes
 
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Bryan Silzer at May 17, 2017 at 11:02am CDT

As a driver I find these Bike Lanes Very Confusing and I have lived and drove in this city for 24 years. When I ride my bike downtown, again no idea on the concept, especially these big green boxes that seem to have you sitting out in traffic as a target. What percentage of drivers actually understand what that green box is? When I have out of town visitors, they avoid even driving downtown because of these bike lanes. When you read the Saskatchewan Drivers Handbook these are not even mentioned.

4 Votes
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Zack MacGregor at May 17, 2017 at 10:23pm CDT

If your curious about the bike boxes here is the video from the city that explains them. https://youtu.be/9iUDkytI-5E?t=1m24s

2 Votes
 
 
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Shyan Jordison at May 17, 2017 at 11:44am CDT

I appreciate having designated bike lanes for cyclists in the city, I use the downtown lanes very regularly. I like the fact that the lanes are separated from traffic, the green zones are helpful in intersections, and the no turn on red signs on 23rd are helpful for making vehicle traffic more aware of cyclists.

8 Votes
 
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R Martin at May 17, 2017 at 11:59am CDT

These bike lanes have been one of the worse things the city has spent money on. Simply put, GET RID OF THEM!

3 Votes
 
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Jasmine Liska at May 17, 2017 at 12:23pm CDT

I am a slow cyclist and, as such, I do not feel comfortable biking in traffic on most roads. I am harassed frequently (drivers have tailgated me to try to push me off the road, ridden their horns continuously for blocks, yelled at me, and even driven up onto the sidewalk to roar past me because I was following the law and biking on the road, rather than weaving in and out of the parking lane). In low-pedestrian areas, I usually ride on the sidewalk because I'm more comfortable riding at a walking/running pace than trying to deal with traffic. Because downtown is a high-pedestrian and high-traffic area, I generally avoided biking there. However, despite the problems, the bike lanes mean that I feel safe biking downtown. Riding in them is a much more positive experience than driving downtown or biking elsewhere. The non-protected bike lanes are just used as a "car door opening lane" or a "parking spot waiting area," so I won't use them for fear of getting doored. "Sharing the road" doesn't work if cyclists like me ride at 20km/h -- drivers here believe that every road is theirs to drive alone. However, the bike lanes mean I don't have to deal with any of that: I don't get harassed, I don't feel bad about having to go so slowly (with my asthmatic lungs and heavy old mountain bike), and I get to interact with other cyclists in a positive manner. I wish there was a more connected network of protected bike lanes like these.

9 Votes
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Lee Smith at May 17, 2017 at 2:58pm CDT

Excellent comment, Jasmine! I wish I could vote for it twice. THIS is why we need safe cycling infrastructure.

5 Votes
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Jasmine Liska at May 17, 2017 at 3:41pm CDT

Thanks!

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Caro Doi at May 17, 2017 at 12:44pm CDT

I am a cyclist and driver. As a cyclist, the bike lanes feel safer than being in traffic and they also save commute time by providing a clear route. In cases where there is a bike lane that has no physical barrier between traffic, I notice that cars often choose to park or drive in the bike lane - they don't always see cyclists, even in designated bike lanes. With separated lanes, this happens less often.

As a driver, I find that the bike lanes keep the road clearer and it is more obvious where cyclists will be. Cycling makes sense for a lot of people in our community and I hope that we can find peaceful and respectful ways of making sure those people have room to get around the city.

9 Votes
 
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Marta Lieb at May 17, 2017 at 2:19pm CDT

Bike lanes are good, but frankly is very underused, plus should be part a walk way not the driveway.

1 Vote
 
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Eithan Pillipow at May 17, 2017 at 2:34pm CDT

Whats good about the Bike lanes? -These lanes are the beginning of a change. That change allows people to use alternative transportation in a safe way in our congested downtown core. -Connection to existing bike-ways and transportation hubs makes it make sense. -Ease of mind for people who are less experienced with biking on roadways instead of dangerously riding on the sidewalks, which is against a city bylaw. -Bikes don't slow traffic as they are separated -No right turn on Red lights along bike lanes, Safety improved for pedestrian, bike, vehicular traffic. -City is clearly showing support for an active lifestyle, improved health benefits. -Bike parking downtown is endless, free, and this helps you access that.

To everyone not commenting what they like about bike lanes i suggest you carefully re-read the topic and think about what you posted and hopefully realize how the other topic was much more appropriate for your thoughts.

8 Votes
 
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Glenn Cassidy at May 17, 2017 at 3:16pm CDT

What Do I Like? Nothing about them.

8 Votes
 
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H R Treimans at May 17, 2017 at 3:42pm CDT

There is nothing I like about them. Get rid of them and save the tax payers money. Goodness knows the administration needs to learn to cut costs.

5 Votes
 
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H R Treimans at May 17, 2017 at 3:46pm CDT

There is nothing I like about them!! GET rid of them.

8 Votes
 
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Matt Wolsfeld at May 17, 2017 at 5:40pm CDT

I like that the bike lanes provide a safe way for cyclists to access and traverse the downtown. Many of my friends and family members are inexperienced or slow cyclists who have had many terrible experiences in town being dangerously passed or run off the road by angry drivers who do not like to drive behind them. Experiences like this reduce the likelihood that people like this will continue to bike in the city. The protection these lanes offer allows young, inexperienced, or nervous cyclists an opportunity to get around the city comfortably.

I also like that the lanes have allowed me to more easily interact with the downtown core as a cyclist/pedestrian. Many people complain about not being able to drive downtown due to parking concerns. These bike lanes make it incredibly easy for me to hop on my bike, quickly reach my destination, and hop off right in front of without any need for extended parking space. It has enabled me to start patronising more downtown businesses on a regular basis.

5 Votes
 
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Colleen Mackenzie at May 17, 2017 at 5:50pm CDT

How you asked the question is biased and may be used to justify this pilot project. "What do we like about them?" should ask what is your opinion on the bike lanes. They have ruined the downtown for driving. I drive downtown at least once per week and have seen cyclists use the lanes maybe twice. 4th Avenue is a mess and now you can't turn right on a red at certain intersections. Oh wait, some intersections you can turn right on a red but yield to cyclists. Bad enough for experienced drivers to figure out, but new drivers or people new to the city? This was a terrible design and waste of money and needs to be scrapped.

6 Votes
 
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Dwayne Vandale at May 17, 2017 at 6:21pm CDT

You never see people on bikes there I think all those bike lanes should be made into accessible parking for the disabled since there seems to be ZERO PARKING for us now

2 Votes
 
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Scott Colville at May 17, 2017 at 7:09pm CDT

I enjoy having a dedicated spot to bike on the road where I am protected from traffic, and don't impede pedestrians or vehicle traffic.

4 Votes
 
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Blair Burnett at May 17, 2017 at 8:17pm CDT

I like nothing about the bike lanes. And that is just my opinion. More lined up traffic.. No turns on reds which is bullsh!t.. because when the lights turn green you gotta wait for pedestrians to cross holding up more traffic. Change to a YIELD at least! Frick!

6 Votes
 
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Carol Jones at May 17, 2017 at 9:51pm CDT

I like nothing about the bike lanes. They are too confusing for drivers and unsafe for cyclists. I almost ran into a cyclist when making a left turn into a parking lot; there were too many cars parked to even see that there was a bike lane there! The poles and lines, etc. make the downtown area look cluttered, confusing, and unsightly!! I rarely...and I mean RARELY see anyone cycling downtown in these lanes. Please get rid of them and leave the streets alone and save the taxpayers money!

6 Votes
 
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James Rassell at May 17, 2017 at 10:20pm CDT

Bike lanes make it safer to ride downtown, which is exactly what the city should encourage. The less cars in the core, the better.

3 Votes
 
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Shelley Neufeld at May 18, 2017 at 6:08am CDT

I'm a relatively new cyclist but have also already had enough bad experience with drivers in the city that I am quite afraid to drive on the road with cars at all. Having dedicated paths and lanes Makes my commute so much easier and I feel safe.

3 Votes
 
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Erin Ed at May 18, 2017 at 9:58am CDT

I like using the downtown bike lanes. It makes riding downtown less intimidating.

3 Votes
 
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Chad Reynolds at May 18, 2017 at 11:02am CDT

I use 4th avenue as both a driver and cyclist everyday (I think it's important to note that drivers and cyclists aren't two different sets of people). When I'm cycling, I find it much more inviting (and safe) in the bike lanes, and when I'm driving I have no problems with it at all, except for where the street narrows just before 24th street, headed north. In my opinon, these 4 or 5 parking spots aren't worth the confusion and potential hazard and should be removed to allow for straight passage as a motorist, and safety for cyclists.

3 Votes
 
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Alvi Campos at May 18, 2017 at 12:42pm CDT

I was out and about this past Monday collecting data for work. I walked every street in the downtown core and didn't notice a single cyclist using the lanes. The weather was nice and I was out from hours where there should have been a significant amount of cyclists; especially if the claims are that about 300 cyclists use the lanes on a daily basis. Unfortunately I think that this number is way off base and inaccurate. Furthermore, my office is located near the bike lanes and you see minimal to no traffic on these lanes during the summer, and almost no traffic in these lanes during the winter,

The notion or idea of the bike lanes was questionable from the start. The lack of use and the ineffectiveness of the lanes should force the removal of these lanes. Various studies throughout European cities also conclude that dedicated bike lanes aren't the solution for cyclists, pedestrians and drivers. If anything the City should explore reducing the speed limit downtown to 35-40 km/hr to provide better safety and comfort for cyclists, pedestrians and drivers.

As a taxpayer I do not want any more money being wasted on such a project. I would rather see my tax dollars put to better use; especially with the economic downturn we are witnessing. Reality is that an overwhelming amount of people drive to work downtown. The City should focus on the necessities of the majority and not the luxuries of the very few. If we are trying to be a "trendy" city that pleases the younger population, I don't think that introducing bike lanes is the answer.

5 Votes
 
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Russ Neufeld at May 18, 2017 at 4:14pm CDT

300 cyclists per day? In winter? Not a chance!!! Colossal waste of money...especially snow removal. Impedes traffic flow (no right turns). We'll need more police to give out useless right turn tickets.

3 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:04pm CDT

...Not if people follow the rule?

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Susan Mak at May 18, 2017 at 4:55pm CDT

Finding this "survey" was near impossible. The questions of this survey are biased. The bike lanes were put in as a pilot project, which by definition is a small scale preliminary study conducted in order to evaluate feasibility, time, cost, adverse events. Therefore, the first appropriate question to be asked at the end of a pilot project is whether the project is feasible, not what do you like about the project and how the project can be improved. I like nothing about the bike project. I think it is a waste of money at this time when we can ill afford it, this includes the costs of installation, signage and snow removal. The limited number of blocks involved does nothing to encourage cycling. Due to the width of our streets, this project causes traffic congestion, confusion to the motorists and gives rise to safety concerns to both motorists and cyclists and adds no appeal to our downtown. As a driver, I avoid 4th Avenue whenever possible. In some cities in Japan, bikes share the sidewalk successfully with pedestrains rather than the motorists. Before proceeding further, we need to do some low costs studies. The current pilot project seemed to have been imposed on us without very much consultation. I know lots of cyclists who avoid these bike lanes for various reasons. I do not believe that all cyclists support these lanes. We should not be governed by a few vocal activists.

6 Votes
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Russ Neufeld at May 18, 2017 at 6:00pm CDT

Very well said. Survey is biased for sure.

2 Votes
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:03pm CDT

IMO you are sort of being difficult. I'm pretty sure the point of the bike lanes are that if people used them then there would be less congestion. If it's causing congestion then maybe it won't take that much longer to bike for some people (or maybe less time and free parking also) and then again, less congestion. The amount of blocks they did was probably to keep it cheaper and less all-of-a-sudden. Yet, you want there to be more lanes because this small scale doesn't encourage biking but you also want there to be a low cost study (which is what this project is). I think the lanes do encourage biking to some people (including myself) and have made it way safer for groups of school kids that I see biking on them (doesn't that just tug your heart strings). Even if the bikes lanes save one kid's life, would that be worth it? If it was your kid or someone-you-love's kid, or even someones-you-hate's kid? If you're worried about governments doing things without your consultation I think this is on the lower end of the scale in terms of level of offensiveness. All cyclists might not support the lanes but I could imagine by projecting my own grievances with them that many nonsupporting cyclists aren't anti-bike lane but just have had bad experiences with drivers/parkers, poor maintenance, etc. That would suggest that we need to spend more time explaining the system and spend more money maintaining them. If I pay taxes for roads but don't own a car, shouldn't I get something for my money?

1 Vote
 
 
 
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Ira GeresCodd at May 19, 2017 at 2:35pm CDT

What I like best about the bikes lanes is feeling as though I'm not going to get run over as much by cars on the road. I use them multiple times a week to either get downtown and to cross the Broadway bridge and those trips are safer than they were before the 4th ave. ones were there - especially at night when there are tons of drunk drivers on the roads. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxLdNZIQEro see, no bikes lanes

3 Votes
 
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Adrien Blais at May 23, 2017 at 8:23pm CDT

I really appreciate being able to ride through downtown on protected bike lanes. It is nice to not have to worry about being hit from behind, doored, or sideswiped by vehicle trying to squeeze a pass in as you would with cycling within the driving lanes. The various parkade and alley access points do introduce the potential for vehicle / cyclist collisions, however I feel like there is a better chance for a cyclist to react to avoid such collisions and this could be mitigated with yield signs for vehicle traffic on all access points.

4 Votes
 
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Maeghan Carstairs admin at May 25, 2017 at 9:43am CDT

If you prefer, you may submit your comments to the Protected Bike Lane Demo Project coordinators at cycling@saskatoon.ca.

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Dave Palibroda at May 25, 2017 at 1:45pm CDT

I love the protected bike lanes downtown. Sure they are not perfect but they are an amazing step forward. 4th Ave is the perfect North/South stretch through downtown connecting from Broadway and vice versa. 4th Avenue is a key stretch in the minimum bike grid that is required for Saskatoon. 4th Avenue used to be very dangerous to bike down the "exclusive" bike lane. The exclusive bike lane was a horrible piece of infrastructure that always had vehicles double parked in it, was unridable in winter and people biking were always a split second away from being doored.
The protected bike lane has pretty much eliminated all of my major safety concerns while biking through downtown.
I love that I now often seen kids biking downtown using the protected bike lanes.
Year around the 4th Avenue protected bike lane is by far the best part of my daily commute.

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Rod Bell at May 25, 2017 at 4:09pm CDT

I like that Saskatoon is looking for a solution to accommodate various modes of transportation, but as someone who works on 4th Avenue, it is clear to me the bike lane experiment is a failure. The level of vehicle traffic on 4th street requires two car lanes in either direction. It is dangerous to exit a parkade when you must advance partially through a bike lane and then stop so that you can merge into the oncoming traffic. It is also very dangerous to turn right on a green light as it is unnatural to have to shoulder check over your right shoulder to see if a cyclist is passing. The cyclists headed straight through an intersection are moving much faster than the car that is turning right, so to make the turn safely you need to be certain that there is a lot of clearance between your car and the next cyclist. It is only a matter of time before a very serious injury occurs. Accidents will happen, but predictable accidents should be avoided.

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